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 NOVEMBER 2017 

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NEWS FROM THE COLORADO SECTION

w1aw-jack

Jack Ciaccia, WMØG
ARRL COLORADO SECTION MANAGER

PO Box 21362

Boulder, CO 80308

303-587-0993  (Cell)  

Email: wm0g@arrl.org

WMØG Bio 

ARRL Section Manager Responsibilities

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colorado-map

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ARRL Activities, Hamfests & Conventions

If you’re organizing a Hamfest, convention, or tailgate we encourage you to apply for ARRL-sanctioning. Sanctioning contains many benefits, and details can be found at http://www.arrl.org/hamfest-convention-application

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COLORADO AUXCOMM BILL IS NOW LAW!

auxcomm signing

(L-R) Senator Chris Holbert (R), Robert Wareham, NØESQ (SEC/SGL), Jack Ciaccia, WMØG (SM), Jeff Ryan, KØRM (ASM), Perry Lundquist, W6AUN (ASEC), Representative Jonathan Singer (D) and seated is Colorado Governor, John W. Hickenlooper.

NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release June 6, 2016

For Further Information:
Jack Ciaccia, ARRL Colorado Section Manager, WM0G@arrl.org, 303-587-0993
Robert Wareham, Colorado ARES Section Emergency Coordinator, N0ESQ@arrl.org, 303-552-7892

NEW COLORADO LAW CREATES AUXILIARY EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS UNIT WITHIN THE STATE’S DIVISION OF HOMELAND SECURITY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

(Denver, Colorado)—The State of Colorado is leading the way in formally implementing the recommendations contained in the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) report to the United States Congress regarding utilizing amateur radio operators during disasters and emergencies, GN docket number 12-91.

Colorado’s House Bill 16-1040 was signed into law today (June 6, 2016) by Governor John Hickenlooper creating the Auxiliary Emergency Communications Unit in the state’s Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management in the Department of Public Safety. The law passed through all legislative committees and both houses of the Colorado General Assembly unanimously. “The unanimous support of the Colorado Legislature on the AuxComm Bill serves as testimony to the level of cooperation that currently exists between the State of Colorado and members of the Colorado Amateur Radio Emergency Service. This Bill will make it possible for Colorado ARES to further enhance the level of emergency communications services during times of need within our State,” said ARRL Colorado Section Manager Jack Ciaccia.

Colorado’s General Assembly found that “Having a uniformly trained and credentialed unit of communication volunteers available for disaster response will materially assist emergency preparedness and disaster response efforts across the state.” Lawmakers also acknowledged that “In recent years amateur radio operators have been called upon by state and local governments to act as communication experts across a broader range of duties and responsibilities that extend beyond traditional amateur radio communication.” The findings went on to note that “While maintaining their traditional roles as amateur radio operators, many of these volunteers assist with the establishment and maintenance of communication facilities, assist with programming public safety radios during emergencies, and act as radio operators on public safety channels. During the past year, amateur radio operators have performed tens of thousands of hours of devoted service to the people of Colorado.”

The new law was conceived by Colorado Section Emergency Coordinator and State Government Liaison Robert Wareham, NØESQ, while sitting with DHSEM staff in a restaurant after completing FEMA’s Office of Emergency Communications (OEC) Auxiliary Emergency Communications course in the early summer of 2012. Over that same summer, and the next year, Colorado experienced multiple major disasters including wildfires that destroyed several hundred homes and a 500-year-flood that inundated much of north central Colorado. Amateur radio operators played key roles in responding to all of those disasters. “The real-life laboratory of successive major disaster helped us quickly realize the need for statewide response capabilities; which ideas worked, and which ones didn’t,” said Wareham. “In essence, we had the perfect storm of major disasters, FCC recommendations to Congress, and FEMA OEC sponsored training to bring it all together into the current auxiliary communications framework,” he added.

Under provisions of the new statute, Colorado ARES will enter in to a section level Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the state’s Office of Emergency Management to recruit, train, credential, coordinate, and supervise members of the Auxiliary Emergency Communications Unit. “Too often valuable amateur radio resources are diluted by having multiple organizations in a single community competing with one another, such as having separate ARES and RACES organizations in a single county. Under the Colorado Model, all Colorado ARES members who meet the training and background check requirements of the AuxComm Unit will be issued credentials that will be recognized statewide,” Wareham explained. The law expressly provides that the AuxComm Unit performs all RACES functions for the state.

Wareham, an attorney, drafted the original bill and presented it to Representative Jonathan Singer (D-Boulder County), whose district had been severely affected by the 2013 floods; and Senator Chris Holbert (R-Douglas County). Singer agreed to be the prime sponsor of the Bill, while Holbert agreed to carry it in the state Senate. “It took longer than we expected, but in the end, the wait was worth it,” noted Wareham. In a tight budget year, the Colorado House made the bill one of its top ten priorities for discretionary funding by that body. In negotiations near the end of the session, Senate leaders agreed to match House funding from its discretionary funds to clear the way for passage of the Bill.

“The way we envision the amateur radio emergency communications community in Colorado is as a triangle with the tip pointed up. On the base level are all amateur radio operators. Hams who show an interest in community service join ARES® and complete some training. The top tier of the triangle are hams who show a commitment to emergency communications by an investment in equipment, uniforms, go kits, and advanced training. Obviously, the farther up the triangle you move, the more commitment and training are required. Colorado AuxComm certification will also require a criminal background check,” Wareham added. “When a disaster strikes that crosses multiple local political jurisdictions the state steps in to support local first responders. In the same way, AuxComm members will be mobilized statewide to provide emergency communications support,” he explained. Auxiliary Communicators will receive state issued identification cards based upon OEM’s Salamander credentialing system—the same system used to credential full-time employees of the office. Local agencies can receive the volunteers knowing they meet specific training standards and have been vetted. Local governments will be encouraged to create their own AuxComm units made up of operators meeting the state credentialing requirements to utilize in local emergencies. The law expressly prohibits any organization from representing that it is an Auxiliary Communications Unit unless its members meet the credentialing requirements established by the state.

While the bill makes it clear that the unit is comprised of unpaid volunteers who are ham radio operators, it, for the first time, authorizes the reimbursement of reasonable and necessary expenses of auxiliary communicators. The bill also broadened the circumstances under which any disaster volunteer, not just auxiliary communicators, would receive Workmen’s Compensation benefits and tort immunity, similar to state or local government employees. The law also includes auxiliary communicators among those volunteers who cannot be terminated from employment for responding in support of a declared emergency. “This statute puts volunteer Amateur Radio operators on an equal footing with volunteer firefighters and other rescue workers with respect to legal benefits and protections.  “The efforts of the Section ARRL officials in partnering with legislators on both sides of the aisle in the state house and senate serves as a model of how to work with lawmakers to protect and enhance Amateur Radio in Colorado,” said ARRL Rocky Mountain Division Vice-Director Jeff Ryan. Finally, the statute authorizes OEM to expend funds in support of strengthening the amateur radio infrastructure in the state of Colorado; and the General Assembly appropriated roughly $60,000 to administer the new program in the 2016-2017 budget year.

In 2012, Congress ordered the FCC to study the role of amateur radio operators and whether there were impediments to their expanded use during disasters and other emergencies. The FCC was given six months to investigate, gather comments, and report back to Congress. That report, GN docket number 12-91 recommended that the federal Department of Homeland Security (DHS) work with state, local, and tribal authorities to develop disaster area access policies and qualifications for trained amateur radio operators who provide emergency communications support. Colorado is believed to be the first state to formally create an AuxComm Unit by statute addressing many of the recommendations sent to Congress.

This is the second year in a row that a bill supporting amateur radio has unanimously passed out of Colorado’s General Assembly. Last year the State of Colorado codified the limited federal preemption of PRB-1 into Colorado law. Prior legislative successes include language limiting the scope of a tower painting bill on agricultural lands, and a provision specifically exempting amateur radio operators from the provisions of the hands-free cell phone bill in 2009. Wareham has now testified six times before legislative committees in support of amateur radio. In one of this year’s hearings one lawmaker actually questioned, “Weren’t you here last year?” The new law takes effect on August 10, 2016. Wareham hopes to have the MoU between Colorado ARES and DHSEM in place by then.

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Colorado’s PRB-1 Bill

Colorado’s PRB-1 Bill – SB 15-041 Presented by Senator Chris Holbert (R) and Representative Kevin Van Winkle (R) PASSED both the House and Senate Government committees UNANIMOUSLY without amendments. The Bill went on to a second and third reading and again PASSED UNANIMOUSLY without amendments. The Bill was signed into Law on March 13, 2015, by Governor John W. Hickenlooper (D). Special thanks to Robert B. Wareham NØESQ, our ARRL Colorado State Government Liaison for getting the Bill written and introduced by Senators Holbert and Van Winkle as well as testifying in committee.

Summarized History for Bill Number SB15-041

(The date the bill passed to the committee of the whole reflects the date the bill passed out of committee.)

01/07/2015 – Introduced In Senate – Assigned to Local Government
01/20/2015 – Senate Committee on Local Government Refer Unamended – Consent Calendar to Senate Committee of the Whole
01/23/2015 – Senate Second Reading Passed – No Amendments
01/26/2015 – Senate Third Reading Passed – No Amendments
01/26/2015 – Introduced In House – Assigned to Local Government
02/12/2015 – House Committee on Local Government Refer Unamended to House Committee of the Whole
02/18/2015 – House Second Reading Laid Over Daily – No Amendments
02/19/2015 – House Second Reading Passed – No Amendments
02/20/2015 – House Third Reading Passed – No Amendments
03/04/2015 – Sent to the Governor

The full text of this legislation can be found HERE

sb-041

Here is the bill formulated by our ARRL Colorado Section Government Liaison, Robert Wareham, NØESQ that has been passed by the Colorado Senate and recommended without amendments and will now be presented shortly to the House for their approval. Thanks to Senator Chris Hobart (R) and Rep. Kevin Van Winkle (R) House District 43. The ARRL Legal Counsel, Chris Imlay presented legal case precedents to be introduced as well. This should help hams considering tower installation to have the state adoption of PRB-1 pre-empt onerous local city and county antenna rulings. PRB-1 can now be introduced and decided at Colorado County Court proceedings versus having to be brought before the much more expensive Federal Court to be argued. Similar bills like this have been passed in 31 other states, so far.

First Regular Session
Seventieth General Assembly
STATE OF COLORADO
INTRODUCED
LLS NO. 15-0339.01 Gregg Fraser x:4325

SENATE BILL 15-041

 Senate Committees House Committees
Local Government

SENATE SPONSORSHIP
Holbert,
HOUSE SPONSORSHIP
Van Winkle,

A BILL FOR AN ACT CONCERNING A REQUIREMENT THAT LOCAL GOVERNMENTS REGULATE AMATEUR RADIO COMMUNICATIONS IN ACCORDANCE WITH AN EXISTING FEDERAL PREEMPTION ESTABLISHED BY THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION.

Bill Summary
Note: This summary applies to this bill as introduced and does not reflect any amendments that may be subsequently adopted. If this bill passes third reading in the house of introduction, a bill summary that applies to the engrossed version of this bill will be available at http://www.leg.state.co.us/billsummaries
The federal communications commission (FCC) currently limits the authority of local governments to regulate amateur radio communications. Any local government regulation must be based on health, safety, or aesthetic considerations must be crafted to reasonably accommodate amateur radio communications, and must represent the minimum practicable regulation to accomplish a legitimate purpose of the local government. This federal preemption is contained in a memorandum opinion and order from the FCC known as “PRB-1”. The bill specifies that no local government shall enact or enforce an ordinance or resolution regulating amateur radio antennas that fail to comply with the restrictions contained in the PRB-1.

 Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Colorado:
SECTION 1. In Colorado Revised Statutes, add 29-20-109 as follows:

29-20-109. Local government regulation of amateur radio antennas.

NO LOCAL GOVERNMENT SHALL ENACT OR ENFORCE AN  ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION REGULATING AMATEUR RADIO ANTENNAS THAT FAILS TO CONFORM TO THE LIMITED PREEMPTION SET FORTH IN THE  MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER PRB-1 ENTITLED “FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO AMATEUR RADIO FACILITIES”, 101 FCC 2d 952 (1985), ISSUED BY THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION AND FURTHER CODIFIED IN 47 CFR 97.15 (b). AN ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY A LOCAL GOVERNMENT THAT REGULATES AMATEUR RADIO ANTENNAS SHALL CONFORM TO THE LIMITED FEDERAL PREEMPTION WHICH PROVIDES THAT LOCAL GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS INVOLVING THE PLACEMENT, SCREENING, OR HEIGHT OF ANTENNAS MUST:

 (a) BE BASED ON HEALTH, SAFETY, OR AESTHETIC CONSIDERATIONS;
(b) BE CRAFTED TO REASONABLY ACCOMMODATE AMATEUR COMMUNICATIONS; AND
(c) REPRESENT THE MINIMUM PRACTICABLE REGULATION

REQUIRED TO ACCOMPLISH THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT’S LEGITIMATE PURPOSE.

SECTION 2. Act subject to petition – effective date. This act takes effect at 12:01 a.m. on the day following the expiration of the  ninety-day period after final adjournment of the general assembly (August 5, 2015, if adjournment sine die is on May 6, 2015); except that, if a referendum petition is filed pursuant to section 1 (3) of article V of the state constitution against this act or an item, section, or part of this act within such period, then the act, item, section, or part will not take effect unless approved by the people at the general election to be held in November 2016 and, in such case, will take effect on the date of the official declaration of the vote thereon by the governor.

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COLORADO HOUSE BILL 14-1216

BY REPRESENTATIVE(S) Sonnenberg, Labuda, Moreno, Rosenthal; also SENATOR(S) Brophy, Guzman, Heath, Herpin, Jones, Rivera, Schwartz, Tochtrop, Todd.
CONCERNING REQUIRED SAFETY MARKINGS FOR CERTAIN TOWERS OVER FIFTY FEET IN HEIGHT THAT ARE LOCATED IN UNINCORPORATED AREAS OF THE STATE.
Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Colorado
SECTION 1. Legislative declaration.
(1) The general assembly hereby finds that:
(a) With the rise in the development of wind energy conversion facilities, there has been a corresponding increase in the use of temporary meteorological evaluation towers to document wind speed and direction in many areas of the state;
(b) A number of other temporary and permanent towers exist or are regularly erected in rural areas of the state for communications and other purposes;
(c) The federal aviation administration generally only regulates structures over two hundred feet in height, and many towers are constructed at a height of under two hundred feet;
(d) These towers are typically only six to eight inches in diameter, which makes them difficult for aircraft in rural areas of the state to see, especially if the towers do not have adequate markings;
(e) Towers are also supported by guy wires spreading out in a wide pattern around the tower, making them particularly dangerous to low-altitude aviation operations;
(f) Towers can be erected in a matter of hours, adversely affecting navigable airspace for low-flying operations without notice;
(g) At least three fatal airplane accidents investigated by the national transportation safety board have been attributed to towers that were not seen by pilots despite the fact that they were flying during the daytime in good weather conditions;
(h) The national transportation safety board has recommended that states enact legislation requiring certain towers within their boundaries to be adequately marked;
(i) Ten states have taken action to enact or initiate legislation requiring meteorological evaluation towers over fifty feet tall to be adequately marked; and
(j) It is critically important to the safety of aircraft pilots and passengers using low-level airspace that the state require the adequate marking of towers that are greater than fifty feet but less than two hundred feet in height.
SECTION 2. In Colorado Revised Statutes, add 43-10-117 as follows:
43-10-117. Towers – marking – definitions.
(1) AS USED IN THIS SECTION, UNLESS THE CONTEXT OTHERWISE REQUIRES:
(a) “HEIGHT” MEANS THE DISTANCE FROM THE ORIGINAL GRADE AT THE BASE OF A TOWER TO THE HIGHEST POINT OF THE TOWER.
(b) “TOWER” MEANS A STRUCTURE THAT IS EITHER SELF-STANDING OR SUPPORTED BY GUY WIRES AND GROUND ANCHORS, IS SMALLER THAN SIX FEET IN DIAMETER AT THE BASE, AND HAS ACCESSORY FACILITIES ON WHICH AN ANTENNA, SENSOR, CAMERA, METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENT, OR OTHER EQUIPMENT IS MOUNTED. “TOWER” DOES NOT INCLUDE A STRUCTURE THAT IS LOCATED ADJACENT TO A BUILDING, HOUSE, BARN, OR ELECTRIC UTILITY SUBSTATION OR IN THE CURTILAGE OF A FARMSTEAD.***
*** Editorial note: That wording may seem innocuous on first read, but the legalese word “Curtilage” nearly always includes (a) the open fields if not posted. (b) commercial premises. (c) the backyard of a house. (d) the sidewalk in front of a house.
“Curtilage” nearly always includes (a) the fenced area immediately surrounding a house. (b) the area enclosed by a fence even if it is not near the house. (c) the fenced area around a house and the immediately adjacent posted fields. (d) the fenced area around a house and anywhere from which the house can be seen.
Because this tower bill really only affects hams living in rural areas, this amended statement should cover them. This wording was presented by our Colorado ARRL State Government Liaison Robert Wareham, NØESQ with assistance and support from the ARRL’s Legal Counsel, Chris Imlay and ARRL’s Regulatory Staff Administrator, Dan Henderson. Locally, we went to the State Legislators and gathered Bi-Partisan House and Senate support to our proposed wording to amend the Bill as worded above in red.
(2) WHERE THE APPEARANCE OF A TOWER IS NOT OTHERWISE GOVERNED BY STATE OR FEDERAL LAW, RULE, OR REGULATION, ANY TOWER OVER FIFTY FEET IN HEIGHT THAT IS LOCATED OUTSIDE THE BOUNDARIES OF AN INCORPORATED CITY OR TOWN ON LAND THAT IS PRIMARILY RURAL OR UNDEVELOPED OR USED FOR AGRICULTURAL PURPOSES MUST BE MARKED AND PAINTED OR OTHERWISE CONSTRUCTED TO BE VISIBLE IN CLEAR AIR DURING DAYLIGHT HOURS FROM A DISTANCE OF NOT LESS THAN TWO THOUSAND FEET. TOWERS MUST ALSO COMPLY WITH THE FOLLOWING ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS:
(a) A TOWER MUST BE PAINTED IN EQUAL ALTERNATING BANDS OF AVIATION ORANGE AND WHITE, BEGINNING WITH ORANGE AT THE TOP OF THE TOWER;
(b) ONE MARKER BALL MUST BE ATTACHED TO THE TOP THIRD OF EACH OUTSIDE GUY WIRE; AND
(c) GUY WIRES MUST HAVE A SEVEN-FOOT LONG SAFETY SLEEVE AT EACH ANCHOR POINT THAT EXTENDS FROM THE ANCHOR POINT ALONG EACH GUY WIRE ATTACHED TO THE ANCHOR POINT.
(3) ANY TOWER THAT WAS ERECTED PRIOR TO THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS SECTION MUST BE MARKED AS REQUIRED BY THE PROVISIONS OF THIS SECTION WITHIN ONE YEAR OF THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS SECTION. ANY TOWER THAT IS ERECTED ON OR AFTER THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THIS SECTION MUST BE MARKED AS REQUIRED BY THIS SECTION AT THE TIME IT IS ERECTED.
(4) (a) THIS SECTION DOES NOT APPLY TO:
(I) TOWERS OR POLES THAT SUPPORT ELECTRIC UTILITY TRANSMISSION LINES OR DISTRIBUTION LINES;
(II) FACILITIES LICENSED BY THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION OR ANY STRUCTURE WITH THE PRIMARY PURPOSE OF SUPPORTING TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT, INCLUDING MICROWAVE RELAY FACILITIES AND TOWERS ERECTED FOR THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING COMMERCIAL MOBILE RADIO SERVICE OR COMMERCIAL MOBILE DATA SERVICE AS DEFINED IN 47 CFR 20.3;
(III) TOWERS WITHIN A SKI AREA BOUNDARY;
(IV) WIND-POWERED ELECTRICAL GENERATORS WITH A ROTOR BLADE RADIUS GREATER THAN SIX FEET; OR
(V) STREET LIGHTS ERECTED OR MAINTAINED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. (b) NOTWITHSTANDING PARAGRAPH (a) OF THIS SUBSECTION (4), THIS SECTION APPLIES TO TOWERS OR POLES WITH A PRIMARY PURPOSE OF PROVIDING PRIVATE MOBILE RADIO SERVICES OTHER THAN COMMERCIAL MOBILE DATA SERVICE AS DEFINED IN 47 CFR 20.3.
(5) ANY PERSON WHO VIOLATES A PROVISION OF THIS SECTION AND A COLLISION WITH THE TOWER AT ISSUE RESULTS IN THE INJURY OR DEATH OF ANOTHER PERSON IS GUILTY OF A CLASS 2 MISDEMEANOR AND SHALL BE PUNISHED AS PROVIDED IN SECTION 18-1.3-501, C.R.S. ANY PERSON WHO VIOLATES A PROVISION OF THIS SECTION AND THE VIOLATION DOES NOT RESULT IN THE INJURY OR DEATH OF ANOTHER PERSON IS GUILTY OF A MISDEMEANOR AND SHALL BE PUNISHED BY A FINE OF NOT MORE THAN TWO HUNDRED FIFTY DOLLARS.
SECTION 3. Act subject to petition – effective date. This act takes effect at 12:01 a.m. on the day following the expiration of the ninety-day period after final adjournment of the general assembly (August 6, 2014, if adjournment sine die is on May 7, 2014); except that, if a referendum petition is filed pursuant to section 1 (3) of article V of the state constitution against this act or an item, section, or part of this act within such period, then the act, item, section, or part will not take effect unless approved by the people at the general election to be held in November 2014 and, in such case, will take effect on the date of the official declaration of the vote thereon by the governor.
Mark Ferrandino – SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE
Morgan Carroll – PRESIDENT OF OF REPRESENTATIVES THE SENATE
On March 23rd, 2017 this came out from the new FCC Commish:

Amateur Radio Gains a Champion in FAA Tower Safety Rules Controversy

The owners of certain Amateur Radio towers have a friend in FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly, who feels that tower-marking provisions required under the FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016, now Public Law 114-190, “could use tweaks.” In a March 10 blog post, O’Rielly expressed his belief that thousands of tower owners in the US could face expensive, unnecessary retrofits resulting from the law’s unintended consequences. The new FAA law would impose additional marking requirements for a small number of Amateur Radio towers, however. O’Rielly said §2110 — the section of the new law that requires improved physical markings and/or lighting on towers of between 50 and 200 feet — is too broad.

O’Rielly said that §2110 appears intended to address dangers to small, low-flying aircraft, such as crop dusters, from temporary meteorological testing towers (METs), among others, but that if implemented literally, “the provision will force expensive retrofits to potentially 50,000 existing towers,” including cell and broadcast station towers and all new towers meeting the law’s broad definition, “all with little gain to air safety,” he said.

The law instructs the FAA to enact rules similar to state-level statutes now in place that are aimed at improving aircraft safety in the vicinity of METs set up in rural areas. In the wake of fatal crop dusting aircraft collisions with METs, often erected on short notice, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) recommended in 2013 that states enact laws — sometimes called “crop duster” statutes — requiring marking and registration of METs.

“Mandating new marking and/or lighting burdens for certain temporary aerial towers to aid agricultural pilots is a laudable goal,” O’Rielly commented. “However, the new statutory provision may have been drafted broader than intended and, as a result, it unnecessarily captures permanent communications towers that have little overall impact on agricultural air safety.”

While some state crop duster laws have exempted Amateur Radio towers, the federal legislation does not. ARRL General Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD, has said, however, that the list of exemptions in the federal legislation restricts the application of the new rules to a very small subset of Amateur Radio towers. ARRL hopes to meet with FAA officials to discuss the issue.

Although O’Rielly did not mention Amateur Radio towers as a concern, he did allow that a small legislative fix to exempt certain towers or to require the FAA administrator to do so “would be appropriate.”

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Youth in Amateur Radio

The August issue of WorldRadio Magazine has a great article featuring Carole Perry’s (WB2MGP) Youth in Amateur Radio Forum this year at the Dayton HAMvention. This was Carole’s 25th year of presenting the Youth Forum and for that I congratulate her. Once again, one of the Youth Forum presenter’s was from the BARC Juniors (Boulder Amateur Radio Club). Gary Bailey, KDØTRO, age 10 was the youngest speaker at the Forum and he WOW’d them with his presentation on “Radio’s and Components I have built and tested”. See the link below on this year’s Youth Forum and the talented young hams.

 World Radio Magazine – August 2013

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The Internet hasn’t buried amateur radio, but some wonder:

Will young people keep the hobby alive?

Ham radio alive and well in Boulder County

By: Tony Kindelspire – Longmont Times-Call 

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AN EXCELLENT HOMEBREW BOOK

There is an excellent book called “From Crystal Sets to Sideband” written by long time Boulder Amateur Radio Club member, Frank Harris, KØIYE in 2002 and last updated in 2011. It’s a wonderful work of more than 400 pages starting with basic electricity working all the way up to design considerations for homebrew sideband rigs and beyond. Full of great photos, diagrams and humorous cartoons, it’s an entertaining read as well as a great reference sourcebook…and it’s FREE! KØIYE graciously and generously donated it to the public. Thanks to Four State QRP and QRPARCI it’s available to be downloaded and printed freely at http://www.wa0itp.com/crystalsetsssb.html 

A very nice write up about the author, Frank, KØIYE appeared in this World Radio Magazine Article in May 2011

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DENVER RADIO CLUB COLORADO NET LIST 

is on line

The DRC posts a complete list of local ham nets on their site. The link is: http://www.w0tx.org/netlist.htm

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CURRENT SOLAR PREDICTIONS

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In case you were wondering….

The Boulder A-Index Explained:

The geomagnetic A-index is derived from the K-index, which quantifies disturbances in the horizontal component of earth’s magnetic field, using a 0-9 integer scale.  K and A indices are indicators of ionospheric radio propagation conditions.

A value of 1 on the K-index indicates calm and 5 or more indicates a geomagnetic storm.  The K-index is derived from the maximum fluctuations of horizontal components observed on a magnetometer, during a three-hour interval.

The A-index provides an average level of geomagnetic activity.  Because K scale magnetometer fluctuations are non-linear, quasi-logarithmic, it is not meaningful to take averages for a set of K-indices.  Instead, each K is converted back into a linear scale called the equivalent three hourly range “a”-index (lower case “a”).  The daily A-index is an average of eight “a”-indices.

For many years, local hams had access to an A-index published for Boulder, Colorado.  Although the formal “Boulder A-Index” is no longer officially published, the magnetometer used to provide it is still operational.  Below, are web links to current Boulder A-index data.

12-Hour Boulder Magnetometer Monitor (USGS)

Planetary K-index

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One Response to Home

  1. Ulrich Hauser says:

    Thanks Jack for all the help. Especially in crisis but also throughout the year as a steady companion of knowledge.
    Ueli HB9TTI

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